Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 33


gristle and tendons, and chop the meat as fine as possible. A half pound of best 
butter to each chicken should be put into a saucepan with a tablespoonful of 
flour, and cook together, stirring constantly to prevent burning. Add a gill or 
so of the stock in which the chickens are boiled, and a tumbler of rich cream. 
Boil eight or ten minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from the fire and season 
with salt, pepper and grated nutmeg. Mix well. Stir in milk rapidly, add the 
yolks of four eggs. Put all on the fire and stew the mixture for a moment, 
stirring briskly, after which pour the mass out in a flat dish, and let it 
remain until perfectly cool. Then make it up into pear shaped rolls with the 
assistance of a little flour to prevent the mixture from sticking to the 
fingers. When all are ready, dip each one separately into the yolk of eggsbeaten 
with a little cream, and roll them as fast as dipped into fresh bread crumbs 
made from day old bread. Let them stand for an hour or so to dry. Now fry them a 
delicate brown in plenty of clear frying hot lard. Lay them in a colander to 
drain. Serve on a napkin in a warm dish.

      NEW ORLEANS VEAL WITH OYSTERS
Make a brown with a spoonful of nice fresh butter, or lard. Chop a pound of 
nice, tender young veal. Flavor with salt and pepper. Put it in the frying-pan. 
Add a little flour. Let it come to a good color. Add a cupful of oyster water, 
and some well chopped parsley. Let it cook for half an hour over a slow fire. 
Add your oysters and let them cook five minutes. Never allow your parsley to 
fry. This makes a delicious stuffing for chickens and ducks by adding a little 
stale bread. It may be used also for small pâtés, or simply serve on pieces of 
toast.
--JOSEPHINE NICAUD.

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy