Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 17


butter, salt and a little powdered mustard and put it in the oven until there is 
a nice crust on top. Grated cheese of any kind may be added, or a few 
tablespoonfuls of well cooked tomatoes, or a few tablespoonfuls of Italian 
mushrooms stirred up with chicken livers, or the remnants of pâte dé foie 
gras, or chopped ham or salt tongue, in fact almost anything that will give it a 
nice relish.

      DAUBE GLACéE
Take five or six pounds of the round of beef, two inches thick. Two days before 
cooking it, lard it with strips of lard half an inch thick and three inches 
long. Tie it in a round with a string, not too tight. Season with salt, and 
black and red pepper, and put in a good pinch of saltpetre. Let your larding be 
almost an inch and a half apart. Rub up your daube with an onion and whatever 
falls from the seasoning. Put it away in a china tureen in a cool place for 
twenty-four hours. Early the next day take one of these thick, black saucepans 
and put in the bottom of it a piece of pig skin the size of the saucepan. Put in 
a bouquet of thyme, parsley, two laurel leaves, one onion, and a small piece of 
garlic. Take three calf's feet that have been cut in halves by the butcher, lay 
them on top of the bouquet, and add half a cupful of meat juice. Let it simmer 
on a slow fire for half an hour, then add enough water to allow the calf's feet 
to simmer very slowly for five or six hours, until the bones detach themselves 
from the meat, the gravy to be tested with the fingers until it has a gelatinous 
consistency. The pot must be closely covered, and a weight put on the cover so 
that it touches the meat. The calf's feet must be boiled before they are put in 
the daube, and that gelatinous water used when your daube is cooked. Put it in a 
clean tureen to take a round form. 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy