Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 16


      HOPPING JOHN
Take a cupful of cow peas (small black peas) that have been soaked over night, 
one onion, parsley and a laurel leaf. Let them boil in a quart and a pint of 
water for an hour, or until soft. Add two cupfuls well washed raw rice. The rice 
must cook about fifteen or twenty minutes. Then add a quarter of a pound of 
well-fried sausages, a slice of ham and a small piece of bacon, both cut in 
small pieces and fried. Put your saucepan aside to soak, or dry. Cover closely. 
Be careful it does not burn at the bottom. If the rice has to be stirred use a 
fork, as it turns easily, and still can not be stirred too much, or it becomes 
soggy. Those old-fashioned black pots are the best to use.--"UNCLE JOHN," S.C.

      DAUBE GLACEE OR B’UF A LA DAUBE
Take a round of beef, clean and dry it carefully with a towel, rub it in with 
salt, pepper and cloves, laid with smoked tongue or beef suet or forcemeat and a 
little garlic. Put it in a cool place and let it remain for three or four days 
in winter. The night before it is to be cooked, squeeze the juice of a lemon 
over the beef, on the sides. After breakfast put the beef in a Dutch oven with 
some drippings--let it boil hot before you put the beef in. Brown well on both 
sides, then draw the oven from the fire and let it simmer for three hours, then 
pare and halve six large onions, stew them over the beef--let it continue to 
simmer for three hours longer, add forcemeat balls, or a calf's foot--serve it 
with gravy in the dish and sauce boat.--MRS. EUGENIA PHILLIPS, Washington, D.C.

      MACARONI
Macaroni must be thrown into plenty of boiling water to cook it well. Then drain 
it off and put it in a dish with 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy