Classic
Cook Books

American Cookery

< last page  |  next page >

page 18


or not; rare done is the healthiest and the taste of this age.

      Roast Mutton.

If a breast let it be cauled, if a leg, stuffed or not, let it be a done more 
gently than beef, and done more; the chine, saddle or leg require more fire and 
longer time than the breast. Garnish with scraped horse radish, and serve 
with potatoes, beans, colliflowers, water-cresses, or boiled onion, caper sauce, 
mashed turnip, or lettuce.

      Roast Veal.

As it is more tender than beef or mutton, and easily scorched, paper it, 
especially the fat parts, lay it some distance from the fire a while to heat 
gently, baste it well; a 15 pound piece requires one hour and a quarter 
roasting; garnish with green-parsley and sliced lemon.

      Roast Lamb.
Lay down to a clear good fire that will not want stirring or altering, baste 
with butter, dust on flour, baste with the dripping, and before you take it up, 
add more butter and sprinkle on a little salt and parsley shred fine; send to 
table with a nice sallad, green peas, fresh beans, or a colliflower, or 
asparagus.

      To stuff a Turkey.
Grate a wheat loaf, one quarter of a pound butter, one quarter of a pound salt 
pork, finely chopped, 2 eggs, a little sweet marjoram, summer savory, parsley 
and sage, pepper and salt (if the pork be not sufficient,) fill the bird and sew 
up.

The same will answer for all Wild Fowl.

Water Fowls require onions.

The same ingredients stuff a leg of Veal, fresh Pork, or a loin of veal.

      To stuff and roast a Turkey, or Fowl.
One pound soft wheat bread, 3 ounces beef suet, 3 eggs, a little sweet thyme, 
sweet majoram, pepper and salt, and some add a gill of wine; fill the bird 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2024 | Privacy policy