Classic
Cook Books

American Cookery

< last page  |  next page >

page 17


easily be engrafted, and essentially preserve the orchard from the intrusions of 
boys, which is too common in America. If the boy who thus planted a tree, 
and guarded and protected it in a useless corner, and carefully engrafted 
different fruits, was to be indulged free access into orchards, whilst the 
neglectful boy was prohibited--how many millions of fruit trees would spring 
into growth--and what a saving to the union. The net saving would in time 
extinguish the public debt, and enrich our cookery.

Currants, are easily grown from shoots trimmed off from old bunches, and set 
carelessly in the ground; they flourish on all soils, and make good 
jellies--their cultivation ought to be encouraged.

Black Currants, may be cultivated--but until they can be dryed, and until sugars 
are propagated, they are in a degree unprofitable.

Grapes, are natural to the climate; grow spontaneously in every state in the 
union, and ten degrees north of the line of the union. The Madeira, Lisbon and 
Malaga Grapes, are cultivated in gardens in this country, and are a rich treat 
or desert. Trifling attention only is necessary for their ample growth.

Having pointed out the best methods of judging of the qualities of Viands, 
Poultry, Fish, Vegetables. We now present the best approved methods of 
DRESSING and COOKING them; and to suit all tastes, present the following

RECEIPTS.

      To Roast Beef.
THE general rules are, to have a brisk hot fire, to hang down rather than to 
spit, to baste with salt water, and one quarter of an hour to every pound of 
beef, though tender beef will require less, while old tough beef will require 
more roasting; pricking with a fork will determine you whether done 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2024 | Privacy policy