Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 62


ding. Another way is to add it drop by drop to a cream or custard. Or, if you 
like better, pour it over your pudding or cake.

      FRUIT IN ITS OWN JUICE
Prepare your fruit for eating by removing the stones and paring if necessary; 
put it in a closed vessel and expose it to a scalding heat, either in a dry oven 
or one filled with water, taking care not to let it burn. Fill up jars and seal 
them carefully. Keep them in a cool place. Stone jars are the best. The fruit 
spoils if exposed to the air.

      PRALINE COCOANUT
Take a fresh cocoanut, break it open and grate it carefully. Take a cupful to 
two cupfuls and a half of the best white sugar. Put the sugar in a nice clean 
saucepan to cook until it candies. Add the cocoanut. Let it cook a moment, 
turning it all the time. Put it in pats on a large china dish or a piece of 
marble. Do the same with brown sugar.

      PRALINE PECANS
Take a cupful of well and carefully peeled pecan nuts. Take two cupfuls of brown 
sugar and half a cupful of water. Let simmer on the fire until it candies. Put 
in the nuts. Stir them all the time until the sugar adheres to the nuts. Be 
careful it does not burn. Put in a plate to cool and serve. Do the same thing, 
but do not turn it. Put them a spoonful at a time in small paper boxes or in 
pats on a dish. The same thing can be done with peanuts. Peanuts powdered and 
added to ice cream is delicious.
(Sold on the street corners in New Orleans.)

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy