Classic
Cook Books

American Cookery

< last page  |  next page >

page 25


Observations.

All meat pies require a hotter and brisker oven than fruit pies, in good 
cookeries, all raisins should be stoned.--As people differ in their tastes, they 
may alter to their wishes. And as it is difficult to ascertain with precision 
the small articles of spicery; every one may relish as they like, and suit their 
taste.

      Apple Pie.
Stew and strain the apples, to every three pints, grate the peal of a fresh 
lemon, add cinnamon, mace, rose-water and sugar to your taste--and bake in paste 
No. 3.

Every species of fruit such as peas, plums, rasberries, black berries may be 
only sweetened, without spices--and bake in paste No. 3.

      Currant Pies.
Take green, full grown currants, and one third their quantity of sugar, 
proceeding as above.

      A buttered apple Pie.
Pare, quarter and core tart apples, lay in paste No. 3. cover with the same; 
bake half an hour, when drawn, gently raise the top crust, add sugar, butter, 
cinnamon, mace, wine or rose-water q: s:

PUDDINGS.

      A Rice Pudding.
One quarter of a pound rice, a stick of cinnamon, to a quart of milk (stired 
often to keep from burning) and boil quick, cool and add half a nutmeg, 4 spoons 
rose-water, 8 eggs; butter or puff paste a dish and pour the above composition 
into it, and bake one and half hour.

No. 2. Boil 6 ounces rice in a quart milk, on a slow fire 'till tender, stir in 
one pound butter, interim beet 14 eggs, add to the pudding when cold with sugar, 
salt, rose-water and spices to your taste, adding raisins or currants bake as 
No. 1.

No. 3. 8 spoons rice boiled in 2 quarts milk, 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2024 | Privacy policy