Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 69


      ART AND SCIENCE OF SALAD MAKING
No careless hand can make a perfect salad. To be sure, Nanette, the cook, who 
tosses in this, adds a sprinkling of that and pours in oil and vinegar with 
seeming abandon, sends to the table prepartions fit for the gods, But Nanette, 
in her line, is an artist who has acquired the simple stroke that produces the 
masterpiece. Occasionally there arises a genius in lay ranks who snaps her 
finger at experience and arrives at Nanette's degree of skill by inspiration. 
But geniuses are few.

In no other dish is there so wide range for individuality of treatment as in the 
salad. No single process in its preparation is unimportant. The meats and 
vegetables must not be too coarse nor too fine. In making them ready the 
chopping knife and meat grinder must have no part. Only the crispest, freshest 
vegetables should enter into its composition. Much depends upon the quality of 
the vinegar and oil. Sharp vinegar is to be avoided. If that on hand is too sour 
weaken it with a little water. A little lemon juice may be used if greater 
acidity is wanted. A ready supply of herb vinegars, such as tarragon, 
nasturtium, chervil, celery and mint, add greatly to the possibilities in 
flavoring. The wise salad maker has at her finger tips a knowledge of the 
adaptability of the different vinegars, flavors and foundation materials. The 
tarragon flavor, for instance, is delicious with meats and fish. The nasturtium, 
most persons think, lends itself best to vegetables. Mint vinegar has its 
votaries, but many people object to its flavor, excepting with lamb, chicken and 
certain green salads. Celery vinegar combines well with nearly all salads.

Chopped parsley, chervil, sheep sorrel, nasturtiums 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy