Classic
Cook Books

Cooking In Old Creole Days

< last page  |  next page >

page 13


lump of ice, the size of your fist, in the centre of the beef, and the remainder 
of the beef laid over it. Let it stand back on the range and simmer until all 
the juice is extracted, then let it have one boil up. Only season as much as you 
intend using at once. The remainder can be kept on ice and seasoned as required 
with salt, pepper, celery salt, or to suit the taste of the patient.

      JUMBALLAYA A LA CREOLE
Add to a cupful of rice, which has boiled five minutes, a rich brown chicken 
fricassee, put it in a saucepan, not closely covered, let it dry slowly, turn 
with a fork. The Carolinians make different perlous prepared in the same way by 
adding cooked tomatoes and butter. Green peas with a little butter is delicious. 
Okra and tomatoes fried together and added to rice. Oysters a little fried in 
butter. Hopping John is made in the same way with small pieces of fried ham, 
fried sausages, to which you add some cow peas that have been partially boiled. 
Season highly. The St. Domingo Congris is like the Hopping John.

      PLAIN BOILED RICE
Take a cup of the best South Carolina rice (whole). Wash it three times in cold 
water until the water is clear. The fourth time wash it in hot water, put it in 
a saucepan with enough hot water to cover it, salt it, and cover closely. Let it 
boil from five to ten minutes. Test it with your fingers. If cooked, pour off 
the water, add to it a quarter cupful of cold water, cover closely, and set 
awhile on the stove to soak. If you fear its clinging to the saucepan stir it 
with a fork, not a spoon. Your rice will soak and dry beautifully.

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2019 | Privacy policy