Classic
Cook Books

American Cookery

< last page  |  next page >

page 13


cask, bore holes an inch diameter in every stave, 6 inches asunder round the 
cask, and up to the top--take first a half bushel of rich garden mold and put 
into the cask, then run the roots through the staves, leaving the branches 
outside, press the earth tight about the root within, and thus continue on thro' 
the respective stories, till the cask is full; it being filled, run an iron bar 
thro' the center of the dirt in the cask, and fill with water, let stand on the 
fourth and east side of a building till frosty night, then remove it, (by 
slinging a rope around the cask) into the cellar; where, during the winter, I 
clip with my scissars the fresh parsley, which my neighbors or myself have 
occasion for; and in the spring transplant the roots in the bed in the garden, 
or in any unused corner--or let stand upon the wharf, or the wash shed. Its an 
useful mode of cultivation, and a pleasurably tasted herb, and much used in 
garnishing viands.

Raddish, Salmon coloured is the best, purple next best--white--turnip--each are 
produced from southern feeds, annually. They grow thriftiest sown among onions. 
The turnip Raddish will last well through the winter.

Artichokes--the Jerusalem is best, are cultivated like potatoes, (tho' their 
stocks grow 7 feet high) and may be preserved like the turnip raddish, or 
pickled--they like,

Horse Raddish, once in the garden, can scarcely ever be totally eradicated, 
plowing or digging them up with that view, seems at times rather to increase and 
spread them.

Cucumbers, are of many kinds; the prickly is best for pickles, but generally 
bitter; the white is difficult to raise and tender; choose the bright green, 
smooth and proper sized.

Melons-- The Water Melons is cultivated on sandy soils only, above latitude 41 
1-2, if a stratum of land 

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2024 | Privacy policy