Classic
Cook Books

A New System of Domestic Cookery

< last page  |  next page >

page 17


EELS.

      Spitchcock Eels.
Take one or two large eels, leave the skin on, cut them into pieces of three 
inches long, open them on the belly side, and clean them nicely: wipe them dry, 
and then wet them with beaten egg, and strew over on both sides chopped parsley, 
pepper, salt, a very little sage, and a bit of mace pounded fine and mixed with 
the seasoning. Rub the gridiron with a bit of suet, and broil the fish of a fine 
colour.

Serve with anchovy and butter for sauce.

      Fried Eels.
If small, they should be curled round and fried, being first dipped into egg and 
crumbs of bread.

      Boiled Eels.
The small ones are best: do them in a small quantity of water, with a good deal 
of parsley, which should be served up with them and the liquor.

Serve chopped parsley and butter for sauce.

      Eel Broth, very nourishing for the sick. 
Do as above; but stew two hours, and add an onion and pepper-corns; salt to 
taste.

      Collared Eel.
Bone a large eel, but don't skin it: mix pepper, salt, mace, allspice, and a 
clove or two, in the finest powder, and rub over the whole inside; roll it 
tight, and bind with a coarse tape. Boil in salt and water till enough, then add 
vinegar, and when cold keep the collar in pickle. Serve it either whole or in 
slices. Chopped sago, parsley, and a little thyme; knotted marjoram, and 
savoury, mixed with the spices, greatly improve the taste.

      To stew Lamprey as at Worcester.
After cleaning the fish carefully, remove the cartilage which runs down the 
back, and season with a small quantity of cloves, mace, nutmeg, pepper, and 
allspice; put it into a small stew-pot, with very strong

< last page  |  next page >

Classic
Cook Books

© Copyright KBápps.com, 2024 | Privacy policy